One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Sustainably Blue Fish Fish has been experiencing a sort of renaissance in the past few years- from the ubiquitous corner sushi joints that dot even the most inland main streets, to the brain-healing benefits of fish oil, to poetic manifestos on the $18 lobster roll (maybe that one’s just New York). We are the world’s third largest consumer of fish, behind Japan and China. We like our: salmon, tuna, tilapia, and shrimp. Until recently, there hasn’t been a lot of information available on which fish is the most sustainable. Farm-raised or wild caught? Alaskan or Pacific? The gorgeous digital-communication website Information is Beautiful recently came out with a great infographic to help us figure this out. Information’s graphic clearly outlines which fish are okay for us to eat more of, divided into four categories: farmed, Atlantic, Atlantic/Pacific and Pacific. Abundant fish, well-caught or managed in environmentally friendly ways include familiar suspects, like sardines, cod, halibut, catfish, dover sole and Alaskan salmon. Some of the worst fish you can buy include Pacific salmon, shark, swordfish, Mahi Mahi and king crab. The graphic breaks down more contentious fish, like tuna- Albacore tuna from the Atlantic is a good choice, but farmed yellowfin tuna is a no-go. Whether eating out or cooking at home, it’s great to have this information at hand, so that you can be empowered to make sustainable food choices. And if you aren’t sure what to make for dinner tonight, check out these three great recipes from the British chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, a champion of sustainable cooking and eating.

One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Sustainably Blue Fish

Fish has been experiencing a sort of renaissance in the past few years- from the ubiquitous corner sushi joints that dot even the most inland main streets, to the brain-healing benefits of fish oil, to poetic manifestos on the $18 lobster roll (maybe that one’s just New York).

We are the world’s third largest consumer of fish, behind Japan and China. We like our: salmon, tuna, tilapia, and shrimp. Until recently, there hasn’t been a lot of information available on which fish is the most sustainable. Farm-raised or wild caught? Alaskan or Pacific? The gorgeous digital-communication website Information is Beautiful recently came out with a great infographic to help us figure this out. Information’s graphic clearly outlines which fish are okay for us to eat more of, divided into four categories: farmed, Atlantic, Atlantic/Pacific and Pacific.

Abundant fish, well-caught or managed in environmentally friendly ways include familiar suspects, like sardines, cod, halibut, catfish, dover sole and Alaskan salmon. Some of the worst fish you can buy include Pacific salmon, shark, swordfish, Mahi Mahi and king crab. The graphic breaks down more contentious fish, like tuna- Albacore tuna from the Atlantic is a good choice, but farmed yellowfin tuna is a no-go.

Whether eating out or cooking at home, it’s great to have this information at hand, so that you can be empowered to make sustainable food choices. And if you aren’t sure what to make for dinner tonight, check out these three great recipes from the British chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, a champion of sustainable cooking and eating.

Let's All Stop Eating: Chicken Nuggets

What were you doing when you were 14 years old?